Design Guidelines, Managed code and the .NET Framework

Brad Abrams

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Exposing a WCF Service in Silverlight

Business Apps Example for Silverlight 3 RTM and .NET RIA Services July Update: Part 16

I am having a blast with the series where I am updating my simple Mix 09 Business Application demo.  In this part, I wanted to consider the scenario that I hope is a common one.  The developer writes their Silverlight app using the RIA Services pattern and the application becomes wildly successful.  So successful in fact there is a demand to put a services head on top of the same application logic to facilitate writing a bunch of other clients.  This is the sort of pattern we see happening with applications like Twitter and Sharepoint.  

You can see the full series here.

The demo requires (all 100% free and always free):

  1. VS2008 SP1
  2. Silverlight 3 RTM
  3. .NET RIA Services July '09 Preview

Also, download the full demo files and check out the running application.

To start with, let’s take the application from the early parts of the series and add a simple WCF head for it.  For this example, let’s suppose you wanted to only expose the ability to get and set the “sites” for our super heros… This enables an army of people to help you spot superheor’s I guess.

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Let’s start by adding a plain old WCF services to our web project. 

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Then we can define our service contract..  Notice it can take any shape we’d like… It does not have to conform in any way to the DomainService.

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More Stories By Brad Abrams

Brad Abrams is currently the Group Program Manager for the UI Framework and Services team at Microsoft which is responsible for delivering the developer platform that spans both client and web based applications, as well as the common services that are available to all applications. Specific technologies owned by this team include ASP.NET, Atlas and Windows Forms. He was a founding member of both the Common Language Runtime, and .NET Framework teams.

Brad has been designing parts of the .NET Framework since 1998 when he started his framework design career building the BCL (Base Class Library) that ships as a core part of the .NET Framework. He was also the lead editor on the Common Language Specification (CLS), the .NET Framework Design Guidelines, the libraries in the ECMA\ISO CLI Standard, and has been deeply involved with the WinFX and Windows Vista efforts from their beginning.

He co-authored Programming in the .NET Environment, and was editor on .NET Framework Standard Library Annotated Reference Vol 1 and Vol 2 and the Framework Design Guidelines.