Design Guidelines, Managed code and the .NET Framework

Brad Abrams

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Silverlight 4 + RIA: Starting a New Project with the Business App Template

My goal is to help you focus on your business, not plumbing code

To kick off our series, I wanted to focus on our goal of helping you focus on your business, not plumbing code.  The first place you will see this in the pre-build components in the Business Application Template.  It describes a prescriptive application structure, looks great and is easily customizable.

After you have successfully installed Silverlight 4 for developers (which includes RIA Services) you will have a couple of new projects in the Silverlight section.  We are going to focus on the Business Application Template.

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Notice this creates a single solution with two projects.  BusinessApplication1 is the client part of the application and BusinessApplication2 is the server part.  These are related projects that know about each other.

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And by default you get the framework for a great looking, professional application

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The starter application is fully localizable and customizable.   For example, I want to change the name of the application from “Application Name” to My Foodie Explorer.  This is easily done in the Assets\Resources directory be editing the ApplicationStrings.resx file.

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Check out a deeper walk through, it is a bit older, but it is still valid and Tim recently posted SNEAK PEEK: New Silverlight application themes such as:

Grayscale Silverlight Theme

enjoy!

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More Stories By Brad Abrams

Brad Abrams is currently the Group Program Manager for the UI Framework and Services team at Microsoft which is responsible for delivering the developer platform that spans both client and web based applications, as well as the common services that are available to all applications. Specific technologies owned by this team include ASP.NET, Atlas and Windows Forms. He was a founding member of both the Common Language Runtime, and .NET Framework teams.

Brad has been designing parts of the .NET Framework since 1998 when he started his framework design career building the BCL (Base Class Library) that ships as a core part of the .NET Framework. He was also the lead editor on the Common Language Specification (CLS), the .NET Framework Design Guidelines, the libraries in the ECMA\ISO CLI Standard, and has been deeply involved with the WinFX and Windows Vista efforts from their beginning.

He co-authored Programming in the .NET Environment, and was editor on .NET Framework Standard Library Annotated Reference Vol 1 and Vol 2 and the Framework Design Guidelines.